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By Trevor Jones
Trevor has been teaching General and Business English, ESP and Teacher Training for the past 7 years in the UK, Spain and France to a wide range of students, following an extensive career in business management.

Tips for teaching English online

By techsrc2371 (Flickr: Student using Laptop) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

In this article I will relate my experiences with teaching English online after 7 years classroom teaching. It will cover in my opinion the important points and discuss links to classroom teaching. I still teach in the classroom and I have found that teaching online has helped my classroom skills and I will discuss this further.

However I would really appreciate your views about online teaching to help me improve my teaching. Please add any comments below the article.

One does not have to be a computer “geek” to enjoy teaching online, just have enough confidence to operate a computer, adapt to speaking and listening over a computer voice network and using a few simple computer programmes. What has been more challenging is the focus I have had to make on my teaching style.

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By Trevor Jones
Trevor has been teaching General and Business English, ESP and Teacher Training for the past 7 years in the UK, Spain and France to a wide range of students, following an extensive career in business management.

6 Top Tips for your TEFL Teaching Job Interview

By bpsusf (http://www.flickr.com/photos/usfbps/4607149870/) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0) or CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

You have found your perfect teaching job, you have satisfied yourself that the school will be good to work for (see my article -on 5 things to consider when applying for a TEFL job) and you have been invited for an interview. This short article offers some tips on how to be successful at the interview:

First remember what Benjamin Franklin said  – “By failing to prepare, you are  preparing to fail.

Some time spent preparing for the interview really can be beneficial:

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By Yolande Deane
DELTA qualified EFL teacher with 5 years’ teaching experience

The TEFL Dream

By Rennett Stowe from USA (Trunk Bay Uploaded by russavia) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

There are many reasons why people choose to teach English abroad, and the adverts enticing teachers away from home all plug more or less the same thing; cheaper cost of living, fun, enhance your career, beautiful beaches, the best time in your life and a chance to travel.

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Put Some Fun Into Your English Classes and Help Your Students

There are so many different ways of adding some fun to the English classes you run that it seems a shame not to take advantage of at least one of them. You might teach them some jokes or some interesting proverbs or maybe listen to some music or watch a film together. Let’s see how this could help.

Help Them Relax

Most students need to relax in order to learn as well as they want to. This can be tough for some people to do, and not doing it well often results in students getting too nervous and stumbling over their words or not listening to you properly. One of your priorities as an English teacher should be help them to relax at the start of each lesson. Sometimes this might just take the form of some fun introductions but at other times you might want to get everyone to settle down and relax with a long game or some other sort of interesting learning method.

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By Yolande Deane
DELTA qualified EFL teacher with 5 years’ teaching experience

Micro-conversations in Kindergarten

I have been teaching kindergarten for about six months in China so I have had some time to reflect on teaching young learners. I try to use moments in the classroom to create some moments of authentic interaction even though they are quite young.

A quick word

I often like to have what I call micro-conversations with the children, for what might take less than a minute, before the actual class starts. I often view these “micro-conversations” as an important part of the lesson. It is in that tiny amount of space that I really communicate with the children in English. I often use language that is not in the set book, or, adheres to any chants, but the children are listening and often repeating, and even confirming with me in their native tongue the meaning of the words or sentences I have used.

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By Yolande Deane
DELTA qualified EFL teacher with 5 years’ teaching experience

How do you balance culture and new methods of teaching?

Let’s Go Teach

So, you are now living abroad, and you want to make your classes fun and communicative, you really want to help your class develop their English.  But you may be in a culture that is not open to your communicative methods, maybe the learners just want to pass their exams, and English is just one of many of the exams they have to take.  Perhaps your learners do not want to speak in class, either because of embarrassment, or the fact that they are from a culture where the teacher is expected to do most of the talking.  Maybe there is a book you have to follow and set exercises that need to be done, and it is frowned upon if you stray from it, in fact maybe there just is not enough time in one lesson to even put your communicative tasks into practice.

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